Chemo Brain

26 06, 2014

Chemo Brain – Part 2

By |June 26th, 2014|Chemo Brain, News & Events|Comments Off on Chemo Brain – Part 2|

What is Chemo Brain?
Chemo brain is a term commonly used by cancer survivors to describe the thinking and memory problems that often occur with cancer and subsequent treatment. This condition may also be termed chemo fog, chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment or cognitive dysfunction.
Although cancer survivors make jokes and try to take it in stride, there is a great deal of concern when one cannot follow a conversation, maintain their previous level of performance at work, or perform day-to-day activities significant memory issues and confusion. Needless to say, these problems can be a frustrating and debilitating side effect of cancer and its treatment.

Click here for Symptoms of Chemo Brain
Research Supports Neurofeedback for Chemo Brain!
Jean Alvarez, a social psychologist and breast cancer survivor, turned to neurofeedback several years after completing chemotherapy in hopes of regaining her ability to multitask cognitively and improve her ability to have a conversation without getting stuck trying to find words midsentence. After neurofeedback, she felt as good as she had before she began chemotherapy.
Alvarez designed a study to attempt to replicate her results. Twenty-three breast cancer survivors, ranging in age from 43 to 70, all of whom had completed anti-cancer treatments, underwent neurofeedback therapy and regular self-reporting evaluations to address the following:

Cognitive impairment
Sleep Issues
Fatigue, energy level, and quality of life
Somatization (physical symptoms related to stress or mental factors)
Depression
Anxiety

Some patients began noticing positive changes after the first six treatments; others began seeing improvements closer to the end of their participation in neurofeedback therapy. Most importantly, twenty-one of the twenty-three women found that their symptoms were reversed after neurofeedback for chemo brain.

Brain Changers Can Help!
Brain Changers understands the frustration associated with brain function issues, including [...]

18 06, 2014

Chemo Brain – Part 1

By |June 18th, 2014|Chemo Brain, Neurofeedback, News & Events|Comments Off on Chemo Brain – Part 1|

What is Chemo Brain?
Chemo brain is a term commonly used by cancer survivors to describe the thinking and memory problems that often occur with cancer and subsequent treatment. This condition may also be termed chemo fog, chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment or cognitive dysfunction. Many of these patients also report ongoing problems with sleep, fatigue, and anxiety and/or depression. Needless to say, these problems can be a frustrating and debilitating side effect of cancer and its treatment.

Signs and symptoms of chemo brain may include:

Being unusually disorganized
Confusion
Difficulty concentrating
Difficulty finding the right word
Difficulty learning new skills
Difficulty multitasking
Fatigue
Feeling of mental fogginess
Short attention span
Short-term memory problems
Taking longer than usual to complete routine tasks
Trouble with verbal memory, such as remembering a conversation
Trouble with visual memory, such as recalling an image or list of words

Symptoms are not related solely to chemotherapy. Approximately one-third of cancer patients show signs of cognitive dysfunction prior to beginning systemic anti-cancer treatments. During the course of systemic anti-cancer treatments, this number climbs to almost two-thirds. Some of these patients recover when treatments are finished, but for a great number of cancer patients, changes in cognitive function persist.

Chemo Brain is Area of Increasing Attention & Research!
Before 2000, it was widely believed that chemotherapy agents could not cross the blood-brain barrier, and therefore, could not be related to the cognitive issues regularly reported by cancer patients to their doctors. However, research over the past decade has concluded that these treatments can adversely affect cognitive symptoms, and that they are all-too-common for patients undergoing treatment.
At the 2014 annual meeting of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), cognitive dysfunction was the subject of an oral presentation, [...]